In a world dominated by magical thinking, superstition and religion, give yourself the benefit of doubt. This is one skeptic's view of the Universe.

"Tell people there’s an invisible man in the sky who created the universe, and the vast majority believe you. Tell them the paint is wet, and they have to touch it to be sure."

-George Carlin

“If people are good only because they fear punishment, and hope for reward, then we are a sorry lot indeed”.

-Albert Einstein

“Skeptical scrutiny is the means, in both science and religion, by which deep thoughts can be winnowed from deep nonsense.”

-Carl Sagan

The person who is certain, and who claims divine warrant for his certainty, belongs now to the infancy of our species. It may be a long farewell, but it has begun and, like all farewells, should not be protracted.

-Christopher Hitchens

 

We shouldn’t be profiting from our students who are drowning in debt while we’re giving great deals to big banks, – the same banks, that destroyed millions of jobs and nearly broke this economy.

stfuconservatives:

smdxn:

Eliz. Warren wants to cut student interest rates to near zero

Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) has introduced her first piece of legislation. It’s called the Bank on Students Loan Fairness Act, and would reduce the rate students pay on federally-subsidized student loans for one year, from 3.4% to 0.75%.
Without congressional action, on July 1 the rate is set to double from 3.4% to 6.8%.
Warren brings up an interesting point – her bill simply asks students to pay the same rates that big banks pay for borrowing.


She’s literally just asking if college grads can get the same deal as bank CEOs. The exact same interest rate. Not even a bailout or anything fancy (pipe dreams!) - just the same interest rate.

stfuconservatives:

smdxn:

Eliz. Warren wants to cut student interest rates to near zero

Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) has introduced her first piece of legislation. It’s called the Bank on Students Loan Fairness Act, and would reduce the rate students pay on federally-subsidized student loans for one year, from 3.4% to 0.75%.

Without congressional action, on July 1 the rate is set to double from 3.4% to 6.8%.

Warren brings up an interesting point – her bill simply asks students to pay the same rates that big banks pay for borrowing.

She’s literally just asking if college grads can get the same deal as bank CEOs. The exact same interest rate. Not even a bailout or anything fancy (pipe dreams!) - just the same interest rate.

goodreasonnews:

republicanidiots:

roccosphere:

Elizabeth “Fauxcahontas” Warren teaches 1 class @ Harvard, makes $50K less than President Obama

Hey Rocco? Elizabeth Warren is a tenured professor at Harvard. They don’t get paid by the class.  


You think that’s bad!? You should see what the top brass at every single major corporation in America are making for poisoning the environment, raiding pensions, dodging taxes, laying off Americans, taking several-month-long vacations and generally shirking their social responsibilities while collecting a greater share of the pie than ever on the backs of people scammed through vicious predatory credit institutions.

goodreasonnews:

republicanidiots:

roccosphere:

Elizabeth “Fauxcahontas” Warren teaches 1 class @ Harvard, makes $50K less than President Obama

Hey Rocco? Elizabeth Warren is a tenured professor at Harvard. They don’t get paid by the class.  

You think that’s bad!? You should see what the top brass at every single major corporation in America are making for poisoning the environment, raiding pensions, dodging taxes, laying off Americans, taking several-month-long vacations and generally shirking their social responsibilities while collecting a greater share of the pie than ever on the backs of people scammed through vicious predatory credit institutions.

I believe in small businesses. They’re the heart and soul of our economy. They create jobs and opportunities for the future.

Washington politicians line up 10-deep to claim they support small businesses, but they avoid talking about a harsh reality: The system is rigged against small business. These owners can’t afford armies of lobbyists in D.C., but the big corporations can. It’s those armies of lobbyists that create the loopholes and special breaks that let big corporations off the hook for paying taxes. While small businesses are left to pay the bills.

We’ve got to close those loopholes and end the special breaks — so small businesses have a level playing field and a fair chance to succeed.

When small businesses grow and flourish, we should applaud their success, and the companies should benefit from their hard work and clever ideas. But here’s my point: If a business makes it big, the reward shouldn’t be the ability to rig the system to stop the next guy.

underthemountainbunker:

Dimon On Whether JP Morgan’s $2 Billion Loss Proves Banks Are Still Too Risky: ‘I Don’t Think So’ – [JP Morgan Chase CEO Jamie] Dimon has been one of the biggest critics of the Volcker Rule, which is meant to prevent banks from making massive bets with federally insured dollars. […] Of course, the point isn’t whether JP Morgan, the biggest bank in the U.S., can survive a trade like this. It’s whether the financial system can sustain this sort of trading by all of the big banks, many of which are not in the same financial shape as JP Morgan. As the New York Times detailed yesterday, JP Morgan and the rest of the nation’s biggest banks have been fighting to widen exemptions to the Volcker Rule that would allow banks to continue making risky trades of this sort. ”I hope that the final [Volcker] rule will prevent this,” said Rep. Barney Frank (D-MA), whose name graces the Dodd-Frank financial reform bill, on ABC today. “The Volcker Rule is still being formulated.” — Think Progress
One Month Ago, Dimon Called Critics Of Big Bank Trading ‘Infantile’ And ‘Nonfactual’
RNC Chief: Leave Wall Street alone – Host David Gregory asked a straightforward question: “In light of the losses on Wall Street this week, you think we need less financial regulation rather than more?” In Preibus’ mind, it’s not even a close call: “I think we need less.” The RNC chief added that Democrats have “made things worse” by approving new safeguards and adding new layers of accountability to the financial system. It reminded me of an Upton Sinclair line: “It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it.” — Steve Benen
Democratic Massachusetts Senate candidate Elizabeth Warren called for JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon to resign his position as a director at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. In a statement posted on her website, Warren said Dimon stepping down would “send a signal to the American people that Wall Street bankers get it and to show that they understand the need for responsibility and accountability.” – The Hill
JPMorgan Chase has been lobbying to make exactly the kind of trades that just lost the company billions of dollars. – Edward Wyatt in The New York Times
JPMorgan Chase’s loss proves the need for bank regulation. – Paul Krugman in The New York Times
More from Ezra Klein…
How Wall Street Killed Financial Reform – The fate of Dodd-Frank over the past two years is an object lesson in the government’s inability to institute even the simplest and most obvious reforms, especially if those reforms happen to clash with powerful financial interests. From the moment it was signed into law, lobbyists and lawyers have fought regulators over every line in the rulemaking process. Congressmen and presidents may be able to get a law passed once in a while – but they can no longer make sure it stays passed. You win the modern financial-regulation game by filing the most motions, attending the most hearings, giving the most money to the most politicians and, above all, by keeping at it, day after day, year after fiscal year, until stealing is legal again. “It’s like a scorched-earth policy,” says Michael Greenberger, a former regulator who was heavily involved with the drafting of Dodd-Frank. “It requires constant combat. And it never, ever ends.” That the banks have just about succeeded in strangling Dodd-Frank is probably not news to most Americans – it’s how they succeeded that’s the scary part. –  Matt Taibbi | Rolling Stone

underthemountainbunker:

Dimon On Whether JP Morgan’s $2 Billion Loss Proves Banks Are Still Too Risky: ‘I Don’t Think So’ – [JP Morgan Chase CEO Jamie] Dimon has been one of the biggest critics of the Volcker Rule, which is meant to prevent banks from making massive bets with federally insured dollars. […] Of course, the point isn’t whether JP Morgan, the biggest bank in the U.S., can survive a trade like this. It’s whether the financial system can sustain this sort of trading by all of the big banks, many of which are not in the same financial shape as JP Morgan. As the New York Times detailed yesterday, JP Morgan and the rest of the nation’s biggest banks have been fighting to widen exemptions to the Volcker Rule that would allow banks to continue making risky trades of this sort. ”I hope that the final [Volcker] rule will prevent this,” said Rep. Barney Frank (D-MA), whose name graces the Dodd-Frank financial reform bill, on ABC today. “The Volcker Rule is still being formulated.” — Think Progress

  • RNC Chief: Leave Wall Street alone – Host David Gregory asked a straightforward question: “In light of the losses on Wall Street this week, you think we need less financial regulation rather than more?” In Preibus’ mind, it’s not even a close call: “I think we need less.” The RNC chief added that Democrats have “made things worse” by approving new safeguards and adding new layers of accountability to the financial system. It reminded me of an Upton Sinclair line: “It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it.” — Steve Benen
  • Democratic Massachusetts Senate candidate Elizabeth Warren called for JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon to resign his position as a director at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. In a statement posted on her website, Warren said Dimon stepping down would “send a signal to the American people that Wall Street bankers get it and to show that they understand the need for responsibility and accountability.” – The Hill
  • JPMorgan Chase has been lobbying to make exactly the kind of trades that just lost the company billions of dollars. – Edward Wyatt in The New York Times
  • JPMorgan Chase’s loss proves the need for bank regulation.Paul Krugman in The New York Times
  • More from Ezra Klein
  • How Wall Street Killed Financial Reform – The fate of Dodd-Frank over the past two years is an object lesson in the government’s inability to institute even the simplest and most obvious reforms, especially if those reforms happen to clash with powerful financial interests. From the moment it was signed into law, lobbyists and lawyers have fought regulators over every line in the rulemaking process. Congressmen and presidents may be able to get a law passed once in a while – but they can no longer make sure it stays passed. You win the modern financial-regulation game by filing the most motions, attending the most hearings, giving the most money to the most politicians and, above all, by keeping at it, day after day, year after fiscal year, until stealing is legal again. “It’s like a scorched-earth policy,” says Michael Greenberger, a former regulator who was heavily involved with the drafting of Dodd-Frank. “It requires constant combat. And it never, ever ends.” That the banks have just about succeeded in strangling Dodd-Frank is probably not news to most Americans – it’s how they succeeded that’s the scary part. –  Matt Taibbi | Rolling Stone

SEN. SCOTT BROWN (R) seems to believe Elizabeth Warren’s personal finances are of the utmost importance in this year’s Senate race in Massachusetts. […] Why should anyone outside Massachusetts care? Because it turns out, the Republican senator’s top political advisers are the same people advising Mitt Romney, who’s trying to keep his tax returns secret. In other words, the same campaign strategists telling Brown to push for more disclosure are also telling Romney to push for less disclosure. Eric Fehrnstrom, who advises both Romney and Brown, believes it’s wrong if Elizabeth Warren releases only two years of tax documents, but also believes it’s perfectly acceptable if Romney does the same thing.

I’ll tell you this right now

goodreasonnews:

If I feel the way I feel now about Elizabeth Warren in 2016 and she decides to run for president, I will strongly consider dropping out of whatever I’m doing and joining her campaign.

^Ditto^

Senator Scott Brown’s crass warfare

boston:

So, Elizabeth Warren is now an “elitist hypocrite” for earning a six-figure income? You’re better than this campaign, senator, and better than the name-calling.

so wait… Now a 6 figure salary IS elitiest? The Senator should consider the implications of his argument.

Elizabeth Warren unloads on Karl Rove for new dishonest ad

abaldwin360:

byChris Bowers | Daily Kos

Since attacking Elizabeth Warren for being too close to Occupy Wall Street was failing miserably, yesterday Karl Rove rolled out an Orwellian new message: attacking Elizabeth Warren for being too close to Wall Street.

On Lawrence O’Donnell last night, Warren was in vintage form as she hit back against this bullshit. The video is above, and Greg Sargent has the transcript:

“Their strategy now is the kitchen sink strategy. Throw everything you can at her and let’s see what happens.

“Let’s keep in mind what was going on just a little over three years ago. Karl Rove was part of the inner circle while George W. Bush is telling Congress and the nation, `we’ve gotta bail out the big financial institutions.’ His Secretary of the Treasury is handing out money to the largest financial institutions — no strings attached. I go down to Washington and I’m calling them out for it. I’m calling them out on executive bonuses. I’m calling them out on the fact that they’re giving this money, no strings attached. And I get attacked for it. Okay.

“Then we roll forward three years. Now Karl Rove takes money from Wall Street, in order to attack Elizabeth Warren for being cozy with Wall Street?

“This one goes beyond anything I’ve ever imagined. I’m just amazed. It leaves you speechless.”

If calling Warren a conservative Republican would help defeat her, then Karl Rove and Wall Street would run attack ads doing exactly that. They don’t care about honesty or coherence, they just want to stop Elizabeth Warren from becoming a senator by any message necessary.

[SOURCE & VIDEO]

crookedindifference:

kileyrae:

Elizabeth Warren debunks some healthcare myths.

“The fact that we’re going broke to pay for our healthcare does not mean we’re getting the best healthcare.”

I love Elizabeth Warren.

goodreasonnews:

politicsplus:

Elizabeth Warren Next?
 


I know it’s a little early  to be talking about 2016, but there is nobody I would rather see run for  the Democratic nomination than Elizabeth Warren.  As President she  would offer all of the many positive attributes of the Obama  administration with few, if any, of the shortcomings.  There is no  politician that Banksters fear more… (video)



I can get behind this.

Even just having her run would benefit the country because of the direction she would take the national debate.

goodreasonnews:

politicsplus:

Elizabeth Warren Next?

 

I know it’s a little early to be talking about 2016, but there is nobody I would rather see run for the Democratic nomination than Elizabeth Warren.  As President she would offer all of the many positive attributes of the Obama administration with few, if any, of the shortcomings.  There is no politician that Banksters fear more… (video)

I can get behind this.

Even just having her run would benefit the country because of the direction she would take the national debate.

stfuhypocrisy:

Elizabeth Warren Occupy Wall Street Attack (by TheYoungTurks

)

She’s so damn good! I wish I lived in MA so I could vote for her. We need a hundred more just like her.

abaldwin360:

“The people on Wall Street broke this country, and they did it one lousy mortgage at a time. This happened more than three years ago, and there still has been no basic accountability, and there has been no real effort to fix it.”

- Elizabeth Warren

Warren4Senate