In a world dominated by magical thinking, superstition and misinformation, give yourself the benefit of doubt. This is one skeptic's view of the Universe.

"Tell people there’s an invisible man in the sky who created the universe, and the vast majority believe you. Tell them the paint is wet, and they have to touch it to be sure."

-George Carlin

“If people are good only because they fear punishment, and hope for reward, then we are a sorry lot indeed”.

-Albert Einstein

“Skeptical scrutiny is the means, in both science and religion, by which deep thoughts can be winnowed from deep nonsense.”

-Carl Sagan

The person who is certain, and who claims divine warrant for his certainty, belongs now to the infancy of our species. It may be a long farewell, but it has begun and, like all farewells, should not be protracted.

-Christopher Hitchens

 

Watch: Breathtaking Time Lapse Video Shows Star Exploding

Ever wonder what an exploding star looks like?

NASA has released this incredible time lapse video showing the enormous explosion of a red star called V838 Monocerotis, located some 20,000 light years away.

The breathtaking images were captured by NASA’s Hubble telescope over a four-year period.

Watch: Breathtaking Time Lapse Video Shows Star Exploding

Ever wonder what an exploding star looks like?

NASA has released this incredible time lapse video showing the enormous explosion of a red star called V838 Monocerotis, located some 20,000 light years away.

The breathtaking images were captured by NASA’s Hubble telescope over a four-year period.

Lawrence Krauss on Life, the Universe and Nothing

Consider that the information recoverable by any civilization over the entire history of our universe is finite in an ever-expanding universe.

thenewenlightenmentage:

Herschel observatory’s population of trans-Neptunian objects
ESA’s Herschel space observatory has observed 132 of the known 1400 cold worlds that inhabit a region of the Solar System beyond the orbit of Neptune, some 4.5–7.5 billion km from the Sun.
These ‘trans-Neptunian objects’, or TNOs, include worlds such as Pluto, Eris, Haumea and Makemake, and make up a vast population of such objects thought to occupy these far-flung reaches of the Solar System.
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thenewenlightenmentage:

Herschel observatory’s population of trans-Neptunian objects

ESA’s Herschel space observatory has observed 132 of the known 1400 cold worlds that inhabit a region of the Solar System beyond the orbit of Neptune, some 4.5–7.5 billion km from the Sun.

These ‘trans-Neptunian objects’, or TNOs, include worlds such as Pluto, Eris, Haumea and Makemake, and make up a vast population of such objects thought to occupy these far-flung reaches of the Solar System.

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thenewenlightenmentage:

The Big Bang’s Identity Crisis
Think of the Big Bang, and you probably imagine a moment in time when matter, energy and space itself all burst into existence at once. Yet many astrophysicists now believe that the “Big Bang” was actually two distinct events: first the inaugural instant of space and time, and second the generation of most of the “stuff” that populates that space. So, which really deserves to be called the Big Bang?
Ambiguity has plagued the expression “Big Bang” since its origin. When British astronomer Fred Hoyle coined it during a radio interview in 1948, he meant it as the ultimate put down. Hoyle refused to believe that the universe had a beginning, a first moment of time and a genesis of all matter and energy. Rather, he thought that the cosmos maintained itself in a “steady state” through a slow trickle of particles into reality. He hypothesized a “creation field” that would gradually generate new matter to fill the gaps between galaxies moving away from each other, keeping the overall density of the universe the same.
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thenewenlightenmentage:

The Big Bang’s Identity Crisis

Think of the Big Bang, and you probably imagine a moment in time when matter, energy and space itself all burst into existence at once. Yet many astrophysicists now believe that the “Big Bang” was actually two distinct events: first the inaugural instant of space and time, and second the generation of most of the “stuff” that populates that space. So, which really deserves to be called the Big Bang?

Ambiguity has plagued the expression “Big Bang” since its origin. When British astronomer Fred Hoyle coined it during a radio interview in 1948, he meant it as the ultimate put down. Hoyle refused to believe that the universe had a beginning, a first moment of time and a genesis of all matter and energy. Rather, he thought that the cosmos maintained itself in a “steady state” through a slow trickle of particles into reality. He hypothesized a “creation field” that would gradually generate new matter to fill the gaps between galaxies moving away from each other, keeping the overall density of the universe the same.

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thenewenlightenmentage:

"As Long as Alien Life Uses Chemistry, We’ll have the Capability to Find It" —NASA Astrobiologists
The James Webb Space Telescope, expected to launch in 2018 (image above), will have the ability to search for the chemical signatures of life in alien atmospheres, however, we’re not sure how life begins or how pervasive it is, making it very difficult to pinpoint when and where to find it, scientists said during a session at the National Space Symposium held last week in Colorado Springs.
"We don’t know how many planets we’re going to have to examine before we find life, and not finding it on 10 or 100 doesn’t mean it’s not there," John Grunsfeld, NASA’s associate administrator for the science mission directorate said during the panel. "This may be very tricky."
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thenewenlightenmentage:

"As Long as Alien Life Uses Chemistry, We’ll have the Capability to Find It" —NASA Astrobiologists

The James Webb Space Telescope, expected to launch in 2018 (image above), will have the ability to search for the chemical signatures of life in alien atmospheres, however, we’re not sure how life begins or how pervasive it is, making it very difficult to pinpoint when and where to find it, scientists said during a session at the National Space Symposium held last week in Colorado Springs.

"We don’t know how many planets we’re going to have to examine before we find life, and not finding it on 10 or 100 doesn’t mean it’s not there," John Grunsfeld, NASA’s associate administrator for the science mission directorate said during the panel. "This may be very tricky."

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Mythbusting Moons - Myth busting Moons sorts out the facts from the fiction when it comes to myths about moons.

check out the whole series on moons

pappubahry:

Spokes in Saturn’s B Ring, photographed by Cassini, 21 August 2008.  (Also you can see Pandora just outside the F Ring.)

pappubahry:

Spokes in Saturn’s B Ring, photographed by Cassini, 21 August 2008.  (Also you can see Pandora just outside the F Ring.)

thenewenlightenmentage:

Astronomical forensics uncover planetary disks in Hubble archive
Astronomers using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope have applied a new image processing technique to obtain near-infrared scattered light photos of five disks observed around young stars in the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes database. These disks are telltale evidence for newly formed planets.
If astronomers initially miss something in their review of data, they can make new discoveries by revisiting earlier data with new image processing techniques, thanks to the wealth of information stored in the Hubble data archive. This is what Rémi Soummer, of the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore, Md., and his team recently did while on a hunt for hidden Hubble treasures.
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thenewenlightenmentage:

Astronomical forensics uncover planetary disks in Hubble archive

Astronomers using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope have applied a new image processing technique to obtain near-infrared scattered light photos of five disks observed around young stars in the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes database. These disks are telltale evidence for newly formed planets.

If astronomers initially miss something in their review of data, they can make new discoveries by revisiting earlier data with new image processing techniques, thanks to the wealth of information stored in the Hubble data archive. This is what Rémi Soummer, of the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore, Md., and his team recently did while on a hunt for hidden Hubble treasures.

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policymic:

How many Earth twins are out there? Hundreds possibly

NASA’s recent discovery of Kepler-186f, the first habitable Earth-sized planet is big news in humankind’s long search for extraterrestrial life.

A universe full of exoplanets: Thanks to the Kepler Space Telescope, which was launched in 2009 to hunt planets across the universe, we’ve managed to find around 1800 exoplanets so far, many of which have been discovered in just the last year or so.

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(Source: micdotcom)

From Wired.com

A stunning 360-degree mosaic of images shot by Nasa contains more than half of the stars in the Milky Way. The images have been captured by the Spitzer Space Telescope as part of Nasa’s GLIMPSE360 project — or to give it its full title, Galactic Legacy Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire. It’s a big name alright, but a project of this magnitude does justify it at least.

The panoramas have been stitched together from more than two million photos that have been captured using infrared light over the course of ten years. As you might expect, the use of infrared light allowed the Spitzer to illuminate and capture much more of the galaxy than can be seen simply by using natural light. Visible light is frequently blocked out by a dust that infrared light can easily penetrate. Stars and other objects emit infrared light, which is then picked up by the Spitzer’s detectors.

The stars that we can see are around 1,000 light-years away, but the panoramic photo captured by Spitzer shows stars that are 100,000 light-years away. The blue stars in the image are quite close to us, whereas the red patches are “dusty areas of star formation”. The blue haze in the image is starlight from mature stars thats are packed so tightly together that they cannot be individually identified.

The Spitzer launched in 2003 from Cape Canaveral and is the fourth and final project of the Nasa Great Observatories program. Originally it was thought that the mission life of the telescope would be two and a half years, which could possibly be extended to five. Most of the instruments on board are no longer usable as the telescope’s liquid helium supply has been exhausted. However some of the wavelength modules on the infrared camera are still operable and in use as part of the Spitzer Warm Mission.

From Wired.com

A stunning 360-degree mosaic of images shot by Nasa contains more than half of the stars in the Milky Way. The images have been captured by the Spitzer Space Telescope as part of Nasa’s GLIMPSE360 project — or to give it its full title, Galactic Legacy Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire. It’s a big name alright, but a project of this magnitude does justify it at least.

The panoramas have been stitched together from more than two million photos that have been captured using infrared light over the course of ten years. As you might expect, the use of infrared light allowed the Spitzer to illuminate and capture much more of the galaxy than can be seen simply by using natural light. Visible light is frequently blocked out by a dust that infrared light can easily penetrate. Stars and other objects emit infrared light, which is then picked up by the Spitzer’s detectors.

The stars that we can see are around 1,000 light-years away, but the panoramic photo captured by Spitzer shows stars that are 100,000 light-years away. The blue stars in the image are quite close to us, whereas the red patches are “dusty areas of star formation”. The blue haze in the image is starlight from mature stars thats are packed so tightly together that they cannot be individually identified.

The Spitzer launched in 2003 from Cape Canaveral and is the fourth and final project of the Nasa Great Observatories program. Originally it was thought that the mission life of the telescope would be two and a half years, which could possibly be extended to five. Most of the instruments on board are no longer usable as the telescope’s liquid helium supply has been exhausted. However some of the wavelength modules on the infrared camera are still operable and in use as part of the Spitzer Warm Mission.

skeptv:

How Big Is The Universe?

Beakus were commissioned to create three animated films that explain key concepts about our universe, with humour helping to explain the ‘almost’ unexplainable! Director Amaël Isnard also designed the films.

In ‘How Big Is The Universe?’ ROG astronomer Liz shows us the expanding nature of the Universe and how this affects the light reaching us from distant galaxies, some of which will remain forever hidden from our view.

via Beakus.